Lord Stanley’s diary and the riddle of Reynolds.

Reynolds’ association with Chartism is well known, but Chris Anderson asks whether there was a hidden side to it. In the revolutionary year of 1848, Reynolds made a dramatic public debut as a spokesman at the initial disturbances in Trafalgar Square on March 6th, which led onto a couple of nights of rioting in the … More Lord Stanley’s diary and the riddle of Reynolds.

An Early Christmas Gift of Reynolds’s Early Writings – from Stephen Basdeo

Unfortunately we Reynolds scholars are not as lucky as those who study some of the more famous nineteenth-century novelists like Dickens, Eliot, and Scott. We don’t have access to decent reprints of Reynolds’s works and we can’t log on ebay or ABEbooks to get hold of a cheap Victorian hardback of one of his novels … More An Early Christmas Gift of Reynolds’s Early Writings – from Stephen Basdeo

“Emulative of the character of Robin Hood”: The Highwayman Thomas Rainford in the “Second Series” of The Mysteries of London (1844–48)

By Stephen Basdeo This post discusses a character in Reynolds’s masterpiece The Mysteries of London, although I do not focus on the oft-studied and well-known “First Series” but instead on the little-studied and unfairly neglected “Second Series” (and Reynolds scholars should indeed study the second series; there is absolutely no evidence to say that the … More “Emulative of the character of Robin Hood”: The Highwayman Thomas Rainford in the “Second Series” of The Mysteries of London (1844–48)

Walking the Streets and Treading the Boards: Cosmetics, The Prostitute and the Actress in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Mary Barton (1848) and G. W. M. Reynolds’s Ellen Percy; Or, the Memoirs of an Actress (1857)

by Rachael Taylor My PhD research focuses on representations of female beauty and cosmetics use in British literature and culture from 1848 to 1901. From performing keyword searches of the JISC Historical Texts database for novels which frequently mentioned cosmetics use to gather my primary sources, I was led to an encounter with G. W. … More Walking the Streets and Treading the Boards: Cosmetics, The Prostitute and the Actress in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Mary Barton (1848) and G. W. M. Reynolds’s Ellen Percy; Or, the Memoirs of an Actress (1857)